Interior Painting and Mold

Interior Painting and Mold

Mold on your interior painting or drywall isn’t just ugly – it’s dangerous! Here are a few things you should know if you suspect there’s mold in your home. Mold exposure can cause allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints. If mold is a problem in your home the only way to avoid mold related health problems is to clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture to prevent its return.

Residental mold over interior paint can cause health risks!

Residental mold over interior paint can cause health risks!

Interior Painting Prep

Before you paint or hire a painting professional to repair drywall and do your interior painting, the source of the water problem or leak needs a permanent solution to prevent mold growth. There’s no point in painting on a canvas that will soon fall into ruin again! You can reduce indoor humidity to decrease mold growth by: venting bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside, using air conditioners and de-humidifiers, increasing ventilation, and using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing, and cleaning.

Professional Painter Tips For Mold Removal

Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.
Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles may need to be replaced.
Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.
In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem such as unfinished basements or bathrooms, do not install carpeting.

Drywall repair or replacement is sometimes the only way to permanently solve a mold problem.

Drywall repair or replacement is sometimes the only way to permanently solve a mold problem.

Residential Mold Cleanup

As painting contractors in Michigan, we know the key to mold control is moisture control. I cannot emphasise how important it is to dry water damaged areas and items within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth enough! If mold is a problem in your home, clean up the mold and get rid of the excess water or moisture. Fix leaky plumbing or other sources of water. Wash mold off hard surfaces with detergent and water, and dry completely. Absorbent materials (such as ceiling tiles & carpet) that become moldy may have to be replaced. The good news is there are plenty of paints on the market today that discourage the growth of mold and mildew on painted surfaces. Today’s premium products — whether they’re made for interior or exterior painting contain mildewcide that keep the paint mold and mildew-free for a certain amount of time, which is typically for the life of the coating. They are washable and/or scrubbable, and they protect against an unknown number of fungi invaders – ahh the wonders of the modern age!

Choosing Interior Paint To Prevent Mold

Ironically, most mold- and mildew-resistant paints are water-based. Alkyd-based products are excellent food sources for mold and mildew and are much more attractive to the fungi than latex-based products. Also consider the finish you choose – the higher the sheen, the tighter the paint film and the lower the chance of mildew growth. Flat paints have a higher chance of seeing mildew because they are very porous and there are more places for moisture and dirt to settle, which is a perfect environment for mildew. That may be why some companies do not offer their mold-resistant products with a flat finish. The most popular offerings include semigloss and eggshell. If you’d like some help navigating your mold problem, the professionals at your local paint store can point you in the right direction, or we’ll be happy to give you a free painting estimate including a mold inspection.

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